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LANSING, Mich. — Gov. Gretchen Whitmer recently announced the Michigan Community Service Commission will receive $13.4 million in federal funds to support over 1,100 Michigan AmeriCorps members. Included in that funding is nearly $1.9 million for programs overseen by Michigan College Access Network — $1,268,838 for AdviseMI and MSU College Advising Corps, and $612,624 for College Completion Corps.

AdviseMI and MSU College Advising Corps place AmeriCorps members in high schools across Michigan, with an emphasis on schools that serve a large percentage of students of color and/or students from low-income backgrounds, to assist juniors and seniors in their transition from high school to postsecondary education. College Completion Corps places AmeriCorps members at colleges across the state to help students complete their degrees or certificates. Both programs help Michigan move toward its Sixty by 30 attainment goal — 60% of Michigan residents completing a postsecondary degree or certificate by 2030.

“Today’s AmeriCorps investments will help us grow Michigan’s economy and ensure every community can thrive,” Gov. Whitmer said in a statement announcing the funding. “These investments — and the over 1,100 dedicated AmeriCorps members who will serve those in need and address critical challenges — will continue to make a tremendous impact in communities in every region of Michigan. Together, let’s help our working families and resilient communities thrive.”

MCAN’s funding will support up to 122 AmeriCorps members across the three programs, with placements ranging from the University Prep academies in the heart of Detroit to Gogebic Community College at the western end of the Upper Peninsula.

“We’re thankful to the governor and the Michigan Community Service Commission for their continued support of these vital programs,” said Ryan Fewins-Bliss, MCAN executive director. “The economic future of Michigan depends on getting more students — especially low-income students, first-generation college-going students, and students of color — into and through college and on track for high-wage, in-demand careers.